Interesting

Aeonium 'Moonburst'

Aeonium 'Moonburst'


Scientific Name

Aeonium 'Moonburst'

Scientific Classification

Family: Crassulaceae
Subfamily: Sedoideae
Tribe: Sedeae
Subtribe: Sedinae
Genus: Aeonium

Description

Aeonium 'Moonburst' is an attractive succulent that forms rosettes of green leaves with cream to yellow stripes and a hint of pink. It is much smaller and more compact growing than Aeonium 'Starburst' to about half the size. This hybrid has more rounded leaf tips, shorter leaves, and more pronounced variegation, which can be variable.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

Photo via blogs.yahoo.co.jp

How to Grow and Care

Aeoniums do not like hot or dry weather. They may go dormant in summer and do not require any water, except in very dry conditions. In extreme heat, their leaves will curl, to prevent excessive water loss. Growing them in moist shade will keep them growing, but their true growth season is winter to spring, when temperatures are cool, 65 to 75 °F (18 to 24 °C), and damp. In the winter, water whenever the soil has dried out. Test by poking your finger down into the soil an inch or 2 (2.5 to 5 cm). Too much moisture or allowing them to sit in wet soil will cause root rot.

A sandy loam or regular potting mix is better than a mix specifically for cacti and succulents since Aeoniums need some moisture. If you are growing them in containers, repot every 2 to 3 years with fresh potting soil.

Feed during the growing season with a half-strength balanced fertilizer every month or so. Do not feed while dormant.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Aeonium.

Parentage

Aeonium 'Moonburst' is a hybrid of unknown parentage.

Links

  • Back to genus Aeonium
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Complete Guide to Aeonium Plants: How to Grow & Care for These Succulents

Aeoniums are a genus of succulent plants with fleshy leaves that grow in a gorgeous rosette shape. This genus covers around 35 species of succulents that come in various sizes. Their name comes from an ancient Greek word aionos that means ageless or immortal.

Aeonium is easy to take care of since this plant doesn’t require a lot of maintenance. They are a perfect succulent for people who are just starting their stone garden. These plants thrive in the Mediterranian climate, so the temperature shouldn’t be too high or too low.

It is good to mention that the majority of aeonium succulents are safe for cats and dogs. The plants are not toxic, so you can let your furry friends play near your succulent garden without worrying something could happen to them.

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Aeonium Care

In warmer climates, Aeoniums can be grown as in the ground as perennials, but it is also common to grow them as potted plants on decks or patios. In colder regions, they should be grown in containers and taken inside before frost. When grown in the garden, Aeoniums command the most attention when grouped in masses. Tall varieties can look like bonsai when they get shrubby you can trim them if they get too leggy. The cuttings will readily root and make new plants, helping you fill out your planting area.

If you have the proper growing conditions, Aeoniums require very little pampering. Otherwise, your major task will be moving them from hot sun to shade and back again, watering, and moving them indoors when the temperature drops too low.

Aeoniums have shallow root systems since they store their water in their leaves and stems. Unlike other succulents, which prefer dry soil, Aeoniums prefer soil that is moist but not wet. They can produce roots along their stems, which you may notice if the plant gets pot bound or the stems fall and touch the soil. Make sure these roots do not dry out. The stem roots will quickly turn the fallen pieces into new plants. Leggy branches do tend to fall over and snap off from the weight of the rosettes. If this happens, you can re-plant the broken stem.

Keep an eye out for pests on Aeoniums. Slugs can do some damage, and aphids, mealybugs, and ants also enjoy Aeoniums. Treat the plant with a spray of water or mild insecticidal soap to remove these pests.

Light

As with most succulents, Aeonium plants grow best in full sun to part shade. In hot summers and desert conditions, light shade may be necessary. Indoors, give them bright indirect light.

A sandy loam or regular potting mix amended with perlite is better than a mix specifically for succulents and cacti since Aeoniums need some moisture. If grown in garden beds with dense soil, it may be necessary to amend with peat moss to improve soil porosity.

Water

In the winter, water whenever the top inch of soil has dried out. Test by poking your finger down into the soil an inch or two. These plants do like more moisture than many other succulents, but too much moisture or allowing them to sit in wet soil will cause root rot.

Temperature and Humidity

These plants prefer a Mediterranean climate—not too hot, not too cold, not too dry. Most Aeonium varieties are only hardy in USDA Zones 9 to 11. Growing Aeoniums in moist shade will keep them growing in high heat, but their true growth season is winter to spring, when temperatures are cool (65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit) and damp. They may go dormant in summer and do not require excessive watering, except in excessively dry conditions. In extreme heat, their leaves will curl to prevent excessive water loss.

Fertilizer

Feed during the growing season with a half-strength balanced fertilizer every month or so. Do not feed while dormant.


Watch the video: Aeonium Sunburst beheading results. I discuss how, when and why I beheaded my Sunbursts.