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Homalomena Houseplants: How To Grow Homalomena

Homalomena Houseplants: How To Grow Homalomena


A recently introduced plant, Homalomena houseplants are the darling of homeowners and interior landscapers alike due to their ease of care, disease resistance, and tolerance of low lighting conditions and stress. Keep reading to learn more about growing Homealomena plants.

What is Homalomena?

What is Homalomena? Homalomenas are tropical to subtropical native plants found in such humid climes of Columbia, Costa Rica, Borneo, Java, Sumatra, Malaysia and the Philippines. Nearly 135 species of Homalomena plants can be found in the rainforest floors of southern Asia east to Melanesia. These indigenous florae are among the more than 100 species of tropical plants in the aroid family of Araceae. Through Central America and northern South America, there are 12 additional species of growing Homalomena plants alone.

Homalomena foliage and stems run the gamut from deep greens to reds, burgundies, and copper tones. Appearing to be waxen, the leaves are of a heart or semi-heart shape speaking to the common names for Homalomena: “queen of hearts” or “shield plant.” Homalomena houseplants have attractive, but very few, finger-like blooms.

Varieties of Homalomena Houseplants

Although there are a multitude of wild species of Homalomena plants, few are available commercially and for ornamental purposes. Primarily hybrid species can be purchased, selected or bred for their outstanding features. These may include:

  • ‘Emerald Gem’ – has dark green, glossy and heart shaped leaves
  • ‘Purple Sword’ – awash with green and silver spotted foliage and an underside of burgundy
  • ‘Selby’ – has light green spotted leaves edged with darker green
  • ‘Pewter Dream’ – as suggested has a powdery gray sheen on its green foliage
  • ‘Lemon Glow’ – sports oval leaves of a vibrant greenish yellow

How to Grow Homalomena

Akin to one of their relatives, the Philodendron, Homalomena plants are tropic-loving plants. So the answer to “how to grow Homalomena” is pretty obvious in regard to its temperature requirements.

Homalomena care as a houseplant will require an optimal temperature of between 60-90 F. (16-32 C.). Tropical indeed! That said, growing Homalomena plants can withstand temperatures as low as 40 F. (4 C.) with little to no damage.

Homalomena houseplants do well in medium to low light exposures but truly thrive in medium light conditions. An over abundance of sun can scorch the foliage, causing burnt spots on the leaves.

Homalomena care will also include a regular watering schedule. Homalomena plants do not like to be dry, nor do they like to be sitting in water. Saturate the soil and be sure to provide good drainage.

Fertilize regularly with a liquid plant food used at the strength recommended by the manufacturer.

Soil for Homalomena houseplants should be semi-porous, peat based (but not too dense) and containing some sand and plenty of humus organic matter.

Additional Homalomena Care

Again, Homalomena care dictates a moist but not waterlogged soil. Dry soil will turn the foliage yellow and spartan. Low humidity will cause browning along the leaf edges.

Homalomena are an evergreen when temperatures are warm enough to avoid frost but if temps drop below 40 F. (4 C.), the foliage of growing Homalomena plants may rot or yellow.

Lush, tidy, clumping plants, Homalomena houseplants are a relatively easy indoor plant to grow with lovely, sometimes exceptional, leaf shapes and colorations.


From Al's Experts

This Week: Homalomena

Homalomena is a clump-forming evergreen perennial with arrowhead or heart-shaped leaves. It's this shape that gives it the common name "Queen of Hearts". The flowers are tiny and without petals, enclosed in a usally greenish spathe hidden by the leaves.

Homalomena generally need indirect light and well-draining soil. Tropical in origin, the foliage will stay evergreen as long as temperatures never drop below 40 degrees F. They are widely considered great houseplant, due to their ease of care, disease resistance and their ability to tolerate low lighting conditions.

  • Easy care, no fuss
  • Keep soil evenly moist
  • Low to bright light, no sun conditions
  • Great for office settings
  • Native plants that can be found on the Rain Forest floors in Costa Rica, Columbia and The Philippines
  • Relative of Philodendrons


Homalomenas are shrubby plants that grow along the forest floor in their native environments, which is usually fairly dim. Replicate that environment in your home by placing the plant where it will receive only filtered sunlight. Direct sunlight will scorch the broad leaves. Provide humidity for your plant by running a humidifier next to it a few times a week, or mist the plant daily with a spray bottle. Feed once every two weeks with a fertilizer formulated for indoor tropical foliage plants according to the instructions on the label.

  • Homalomena house plants thrive in rich, loamy soil that drains well.
  • Choose a container with a drainage hole and a water catch tray, and use a commercial potting mix that has peat moss in the ingredients, which will help with drainage.

Watering Requirements

Since Homalomena Camouflage love moisture, you should water your plant enough to keep the soil moist. When watering your Homalomena Camouflage, be sure to water throughly, allowing it to drain completely. Always make sure you empty the saucer after every watering so the plant doesn’t stay sitting in water as this could cause damage to the roots. Aside from solely relying on the watering frequency to tell when your plant is thirsty, a tell tale sign that your Homalomena Camouflage needs water is the foliage turning yellow and spartan. During winter, you should allow the top half of soil to dry out between waterings.


Homalomena | Plant Care Guide

You might not be able to pronounce his name but we promise that won’t even matter when you get your hands on one of these bad boys.

With incredible detail on each leaf (especially the camouflage variety!) and rapid growth in the warmer months, these have become one of our fave plants to collect.

Light

Homalomena likes medium indirect light but can survive in lower light if you’re happy for her to grow quite slowly. No direct sun or the leaves will burn.

Water

Homalomena like to be kept slightly moist but not drenched. Allow the top 2 inches of soil to dry out before each water and be sure not to leave any water in the tray.

Spritz regularly to keep the leaf tips from browning and help with humidity.

Maintenance

Feed with a slow-release fertiliser once every four months following the instructions on the packet (remember, when you receive a plant from Green Assembly, it has enough slow-release fertiliser to last the first 4 months).

During the warmer months, she likes a drink of the stinky liquid fish stuff (like Seasol) monthly, again be sure to follow the dilution instructions on the packet. Then sit back and watch her sprout fresh new leaves.

Yellow leaves are typical for this gal as she grows new leaves and discards some of the older ones. But if you are noticing several yellow leaves at once on the reg then it is a sign, something is wrong.

Usually, it will be a sign of too much water, too often so try easing up a little and let it dry out more between watering. Also look for bugs as that can cause stress on the plant and create yellowing leaves.

She’s also a little sensitive to draughts and doesn’t love the cold weather, so try to keep her in a warm spot in the cooler months.

Use a moisture metre stick to check the soil every few days rather than having to dig in the soil with your finger.


Sick homalomena

Gardening Reference » Gardening in 2005

this once gorgeous homalomena was given to me as a gift on thanksgiving, and since then, the leaves have continued to yellow, wilt and die. i have been very careful with the amount of water it gets, as i thought that was the problem, but even still it continues to perish. i have even repotted it to make sure the roots were healthy. is there anything i can do to stop it from perishing?

I'm wondering if chlorisis could be the problem. I'm looking at the leaves and notice that the veins are still green. Take a look at these sites.

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When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.

Amy, you make me blush! I'm glad we found the problem. Now for the solution (pardon the pun), but I think the way to go is with treating the soil so the plant can take up the nutrients it needs. You could get one of those test kits for soil ph since we now know that the ph preference is 6.0 to 6.5, which is slightly acid. I don't think that this is something you have caused. Actually most potting soils are peat moss based and tend to be acidic.

The recommendation from the folks of your tag is "Constant feed with 200 ppm N with a 3-1-2 ratio of N-P-K, including Mg and trace elements." I do tend to prefer organic fertilizers to the synthetics as they are gentler and often contain more trace elements. I have fish emulsion with a ratio of 5-1-1 and seaweed with a ratio of 0-0.2-1 but they come in different combinations. The one that comes to mind with the proper ratio is alfalfa meal. Take a look here. They have other offerings as well, but you should be able to find these products at a good garden center.

* * * *
When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.

Newt, you really are a darling, but I just don't think I'm up to the task. I appreciate your insight immensely, but I'm afraid I'm a "weekend gardener", if you will. Anything that even mentions the periodic table of elements, and I'm out.
Take a gander of what's left of my poor baby:

I'll just keep fertilizing with, ahem, MG(so sorry!), and hacking away 'til it's time for the graveyard. My apologies, Newt.

But while I have your attention, check out this bad boy I just recently adopted. African Mask, have you heard anything about them? Now this is something I could adjust my pH for!

Amy, do you cook on that stove? It's so clean and I'm jealous. If so, do remove the plants to a 'safe place'.

I was surprised to see how little of your plant is left, but maybe what is left is healthy and will rebound. The soil looks a bit dry on top though. Next time you repot it, you might want to leave more room at the top for watering. I tend to leave about 2" of space so I can water well.

Your Alocasia x amazonica 'African Mask' is also known as Elephant ears. Do you need care info? Here's one that might prove useful.

I also love your abalone shell!

* * * *
When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.

Amy, I love your "African Mask" Elephant Ear! It's GORGEOUS!

I was wondering the same thing as Newt. your stove looks suspiciously clean.

I had to look up the meaning of taqueria! Sounds delicious! When I visited my mother in Phoenix we found one that had the most delicious food! Taco Bell just can't compete with that.

Hope we don't get to read any obits either.

* * * *
When weeding, the best way to make sure you are removing a weed and not a valuable plant is to pull on it. If it comes out of the ground easily, it is a valuable plant.


Homalomena Care - Tips For Growing Homalomena Plants - garden

This Week: Homalomena

Homalomena is a clump-forming evergreen perennial with arrowhead or heart-shaped leaves. It's this shape that gives it the common name "Queen of Hearts". The flowers are tiny and without petals, enclosed in a usally greenish spathe hidden by the leaves.

Homalomena generally need indirect light and well-draining soil. Tropical in origin, the foliage will stay evergreen as long as temperatures never drop below 40 degrees F. They are widely considered great houseplant, due to their ease of care, disease resistance and their ability to tolerate low lighting conditions.

  • Easy care, no fuss
  • Keep soil evenly moist
  • Low to bright light, no sun conditions
  • Great for office settings
  • Native plants that can be found on the Rain Forest floors in Costa Rica, Columbia and The Philippines
  • Relative of Philodendrons


Watch the video: TRANSPLANTINGPROPAGATING OF HOMALOMENA PLANT