Miscellaneous

What Are Differences Between Rambler Roses And Climbing Roses?

What Are Differences Between Rambler Roses And Climbing Roses?


By: Stan V. Griep, American Rose Society Consulting Master Rosarian, Rocky Mountain District

In this article, we will take a look at two classifications of roses: the rambler roses and the climbing roses. There are distinct differences. Let’s take a look at the differences between rambler roses and climbing roses.

What are Rambler Roses?

The rambler or rambling roses are one of the ancestors of the climbing rose bushes of today. The rambler roses descended mostly from the roses known as R. wichuraiana and R. multiflora, which are very large and hardy rose bushes with flexible canes that pretty much bloom only once in the early summertime, although some will bloom more often. The R. wichuraiana roses are said to have the stronger canes that allow them to be excellent for even the most challenging of climbing situations.

The rambler roses are truly vigorous climbers but should not be grouped into the climbing rose class. They are unique and need to be preserved as such. These are the roses seen in many of the old paintings of Victorian gardens in England. Many rambler roses are wonderfully fragrant and put on such a grand display when in bloom that their limited in-bloom time is no deterrent.

The R. multiflora rambler rose is originally from the orient. Rosa multiflora is so vigorous that it is a popular rootstock for grafting with other more popular roses so that they may survive in the toughest of climates.

Some beautiful rambler roses are:

  • Darlow’s Enigma Rose
  • The King’s Rubies Rose
  • Apple Blossom Rose
  • Alexandre Girault Rose

What are Climbing Roses?

Climbing rose bushes are well classified as they do just that, they climb. Climbing roses are actually a quite diverse group that grows long arching canes that can be tied up and trained along fences, walls, trellises, and arbors.

When I think of climbing roses, two come immediately to mind. One is named Blaze, a beautiful red blooming climber my mother grew. Another is a beautiful pink climber named New Dawn that I have seen beautifully draping up and over arbors. A sport of hers named Awakening is said to be even more profuse about blooming as well as being a hardier rose bush. Many climbing rose bushes are actually what are known as sports or mutations of other rose bushes, which includes the miniature rose bushes as well.

Climbing roses are excellent for limited flat space garden areas that have a lot of open vertical space to climb up and elegantly drape the area with beautiful blooms. This group of roses has a large variance in their winter hardiness, so be sure to check the recommended growing/hardiness zones before you buy.

Some popular and beautiful climbing roses are:

  • Dublin Bay Rose
  • Joseph’s Coat Rose
  • New Dawn Rose
  • Fourth of July Rose
  • Altissimo Rose
  • Clair Matin Rose
  • Penny Lane Rose

Some miniature climbing roses are:

  • Climbing Rainbows End Rose
  • Climbing Kristin Rose
  • Jeanne LaJoie Rose

These two are beautiful classes of rose bushes that are often featured in paintings and photography, as they easily stir the romantic side within us all.

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Climbing Roses

Our selection of Climbing roses including David Austin Climbing Roses produce mainly large flowers which are freely produced in large heavy clusters which repeat though summer and autumn creating a large display of stunning colour and fragrance in your garden. These are perfect for formal training along 1.8m + fences, walls, pergolas and large trellis framework. Normally with correct tieing in and training it will take our fragrant climbing roses 2 or 3 years to reach their full and usual height. Train main leader shoots sideways and then upwards to create a well balanced framework of main stems, this will help to keep the flowers lower down in later years. In addition some of our Fragrant Climbing Roses will tolerate semi-shade, please see our selections below for North walls if you have a semi shaded position. Plant Climbing roses around 1.80m apart, flowering heights range from 1.80m to 5.0m depending on the climbing rose selected.

David Austin Climbing Roses are very adaptable and perfect for many situations including arches, obelisks, large containers, fences and walls. They also tolerate semi-shaded positions well, still producing good numbers of bloom all over the growth.

Alternatively you could try a Rambling rose, these grow rapidly and quickly cover an area, producing huge quantities of smaller flowers all over their growth and unlike nearly all of their older predecessors will in most cases repeat flower from mid-summer to late autumn, their are also a small number of spring flowering rambling roses ( see Rosa Banksiae Lutea, Alba Plena, Normalis). Please click here for Ramblers or visit our Rambling Rose section on the homepage / Shop / By Type.


Climbing & Tree Roses

There are so many wonderful ways roses can be used in your garden landscape. Climbing roses and tree roses are just two of those! At SummerWinds Nursery, we offer an array of roses for your every gardening desire.

Climbing Roses

Climbing roses can be trained to grow on walls, posts, trellises, arbors and much more! Whether you want to add a whimsical splash of twisting color, add interest and texture to an otherwise bare wall, or if you want to create some privacy, climbing roses can help you accomplish these garden goals!

Most Climbing roses grow anywhere from 8'–20' in height and exhibit repeat-blooms. They lack the ability to cling to supports on their own, and must be manually trained and tied over structures such as arbors. Climbing roses are great for arbors and entry ways. They flower on green canes that get direct sun light and only require pruning every other to every third year to remove gray wood.

Click on any of the blue rose names below to view a picture of that variety and to learn more about it.

For availability, please contact your local SummerWinds Nursery.

Some of our favorite climbing roses include:

This very fragrant, award-winning rose is a fast growing, vigorous climber with medium green foliage. It boasts numerous perfectly shaped large coral flowers throughout the season. Its fragrance is best described as strong and spicy.

  • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
  • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
  • Average Landscape Size: 10 to 12 feet tall
  • Blooms: Large, fragrant blooms with 45-50 petals
  • Landscape Uses: Barrier, Cutting Garden, Espalier, Privacy Screen, Specimen, Urban Garden

This low-maintenance rose is one of our favorites. Enjoy a light fragrance and cascades of pure red color among leather green foliage as this variety climbs on wood, walls and more.

  • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
  • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
  • Average Landscape Size: Climbs 12 to 14 feet tall
  • Blooms: Medium-size blooms of 20-25 petals
  • Landscape Uses: Barrier, Cutting Garden, Espalier, Privacy Screen, Specimen, Urban Garden

This variety is particularly wonderful for cut miniature bouquets. It boasts petite, delicate, pointed buds that open to be large sprays of fragrant, light pink, double-blooms.

  • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
  • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
  • Average Landscape Size: Moderate growing flexible canes reach 10 to 20 feet long, 3 to 6 feet wide.
  • Key Features: Showy, fragrant flowers
  • Blooms: Spring through fall
  • Landscape Uses: Barrier, Cutting Garden, Espalier, Privacy Screen, Specimen, Urban Garden

This variety has seduced gardeners for over 50 years with its dark, velvety blooms that boast a strong rose fragrance.

  • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
  • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
  • Average Landscape Size: 12 to 14 feet tall
  • Blooms: Large blooms with 30-35 petals
  • Landscape Uses: Barrier, Cutting Garden, Espalier, Privacy Screen, Specimen, Urban Garden

Adored for a kaleidoscope of colors ranging from yellow to scarlet, and orange to carmine, the blooms of this lightly fragrant rose grow among apple green colored glossy foliage.

  • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
  • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
  • Average Landscape Size: 10 to 12 feet tall
  • Blooms: Medium blooms with 23-38 petals
  • Landscape Uses: Barrier, Cutting Garden, Espalier, Privacy Screen, Specimen, Urban Garden

Tree Roses

Tree roses are actually two different roses combined into a single plant. It consists of a root stock grown up as a trunk and the canopy, which is the desired variety. A tree rose is essentially just a normal 'bush' rose two, three, or four feet off the ground. Tree roses make a great garden accent and do require a good strong stake to support their blooms.

Click on any of the blue rose names below to view a picture of that variety and to learn more about it.

Available seasonally, while supplies last - where indicated below.

Selection Includes:

    Angel Face (Floribunda Rose) - Available while supplies last

This modern rose boasts ruffled petals with a pure, vivid lavender color and a strong citrus fragrance, alongside leathery foliage.

  • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
  • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
  • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
  • Blooms: Medium blooms with 25-30 petals
  • Landscape Uses: Border, container, hedge, mass planting, specimen

  • Brick House - Available while supplies last
  • Brandy™ (Hybrid Tea Rose) - Available while supplies last

    This Hybrid Tea variety boasts huge apricot blooms with a robust fragrance, dark green foliage and thick, upright stems that are great for cutting.

    • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
    • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
    • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
    • Blooms: Large apricot blooms with 30-35 petals
    • Landscape Uses: Barrier, border, container, cutting garden, mass planting

    California Dreamin' - Available while supplies last

    Double Delight® (Hybrid Tea Rose) - will be available third week in Feb.

    The Double Delight® is a multicolored rose with deep green foliage and a strong spice fragrance. It boasts beautiful, large tea-shaped blooms with 30-35 petals with a creamy-white center and a strawberry-red edge. A member of the Rose Hall of Fame as of 1985.

    • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
    • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
    • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
    • Key Features: Continual blooming
    • Blooms: Late spring/early summer through fall
    • Landscape Uses: Barrier, border, container, cutting garden, mass planting

  • Honor - Available while supplies last
  • Ingrid Bergman - Available while supplies last
  • Intrigue - Available while supplies last
  • Legends™ (Hybrid Tea Rose) - Call your local SummerWinds Nursery for availability

    This rose boasts monstrous buds and gigantic blooms of rich, bright ruby red color that lasts for the life of its blossoms. Immensely large petals open to ruffled, slightly fragrant 5-8 inch blossoms.

    • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
    • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
    • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
    • Blooms: Very large blooms with approx. 30 petals
    • Landscape Uses: Barrier, border, container, cutting garden, mass planting

  • Midas Touch - Available while supplies last
  • Olympiad™ (Hybrid Tea Rose) - Available while supplies last

    Bright, true red blooms grow among grey-green foliage and boast a light, fruity fragrance.

    • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
    • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
    • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
    • Blooms: Medium blooms with 30-35 petals
    • Landscape Uses: Barrier, border, container, cutting garden, mass planting

    Peace (Hybrid Tea Rose) - Available while supplies last

    Tremendously fragrant, this fully double, pink-flushed, primrose-yellow blooming rose is long-lasting and showy.

    • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
    • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
    • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
    • Blooms: Showy flowers bloom late spring through early fall
    • Landscape Uses: Barrier, border, container, cutting garden, mass planting

  • Polynesian Punch - Available while supplies last
  • Romantica - Available while supplies last
  • White Iceberg Shrub Rose (Floribunda Rose) - Available while supplies last

    This widely recognized rose is appreciated for its profusion of bright white, summer-long, free-flowering blooms and vigorous growth.

    • Light: At least a half-day of sun to full sun keep away from reflective hot walls
    • Water: Needs regular watering—weekly, or more often in extreme heat or in containers
    • Average Landscape Size: Approximately a 36-inch tall tree
    • Key Features: Profusion of showy flowers
    • Blooms: Late spring to early fall no significant fragrance
    • Landscape Uses: Border, container, hedge, mass planting, specimen


    WHEN TO PRUNE CLIMBING ROSES

    Spring: Pruning of climbers in early spring should be very light, removing only winter-killed wood on canes and branches.

    For reblooming varieties, deadhead the sideshoots after the first bloom in spring to promote the next wave of flowers.

    Summer: The best time to perform major pruning (removing one or more canes) on a climber is right after it has finished flowering. The strong new canes that sprout afterward will then have time to mature and produce roses the next year. Without periodic removal of its oldest canes, a climber will become an overgrown thicket.

    Any time: Lateral canes can be pruned at any time to keep the climber in shape.


    Watch the video: Heirloom Ramblers