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Growing Primroses Indoors: Tips For Primrose Indoor Care

Growing Primroses Indoors: Tips For Primrose Indoor Care


By: Heather Rhoades

The primrose houseplant (Primula) is often found for sale in the late winter or early spring. The cheery flowers on primroses can do quite a bit to chase away winter’s dreariness, but they also leave many owners asking how to grow primrose indoors. Primrose indoor care is important if you would like these lovely plant to survive.

How to Grow Primrose Indoors

The first thing to remember about your primrose houseplant is that the people who sold it to you did not expect you to keep it as a houseplant. Primroses indoors are typically thought of by the houseplant industry as a short term houseplant (much like orchids and poinsettias). They are sold with the intention of providing a few weeks of bright flowers and then discarded after the blooms have faded. While growing primroses indoors beyond their bloom span is possible, it is not always easy. Because of this, many people choose to simply plant their primrose houseplant out into the garden after the flowers are gone.

If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light.

Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in dry soil. Primroses indoors also need high humidity. You can raise the humidity around the primrose plant by placing it on a pebble tray.

It is important to your success of growing primroses indoors that these plants be kept in temperatures below 80 F (27 C.). They grow best in temperatures between 50 and 65 F. (10-18 C.).

Primrose houseplants should be fertilized about once a month except for when they are in bloom. They should not be fertilized at all when in bloom.

Getting a primrose growing indoors to bloom again is difficult. Most people have success if they move their primrose outdoors during the summer months and bring it back inside for the winter where the plant should be allowed to go dormant for one to two months. Even with all this, there are only even odds that your primrose houseplant will bloom again.

Regardless of whether you decide to keep your primrose after it blooms or not, proper primrose indoor care will ensure that its bright, winter chasing blooms last as long as possible.

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Wow! Sometimes simplicity rules the day. I really like this video about primrose plant care from the folks at Almondsbury Garden Centre because we get a lot of questions about the care of primrose plants.

The primrose plants most often sold by florists are the polyanthus primula, which is a hybrid variety. They are a common plant found at many floral outlets in the fall, winter, and early spring.

It is a low-growing and compact plant that features small, vibrant clusters of flowers that grow from the center of the plant.

Primrose plant care is really pretty easy as you’ll see in this short video clip. Watch it – I think you’ll agree.


Didn’t I tell you it was pretty simple? Just to recap…

Primrose plant care is very easy if you follow these simple tips.

  • Primroses like cooler conditions and can remain in bloom for weeks if kept at temperatures between 50° to 60° F.
  • Primroses need little direct sunlight, making them a great winter-blooming plant to enjoy in this area.
  • Water your primrose frequently, but do not allow it to sit in water, as it can cause the plant to rot.

My Primroses Are Done Flowering. What Do I Do Now?

Just like a few of today’s elite college basketball players, primulas are a blooming plant that’s also considered “one and done”.

After primulas are through blooming, they can be discarded. If you hate the thought of just throwing them away, you can try replanting them outdoors.

If you have an area that’s suitable for growing them, it’s definitely an option.

You can find more information on replating them outdoors here: Primula For All Climates

More Tips and Advice on Indoor Primrose Care

If you would like a little more in-depth care information about caring for primroses indoors, here a couple of resources worth checking out:

Care indoors. Keep the plant in bright, indirect sun. Direct sun can scorch the leaves causing dried browned spots. This blooming houseplant will last longer in cooler temperatures (60F). The soil should be well-drained and… Read more …

Showy primrose flowers are available from florists mid-winter and produce bright blooms for several weeks. Primrose plant profile, picture, and care tips. Read more …

Primroses are small, colorful woodland perennials that last for many years with the right planting and care. These plants bloom in a range of colors and grow best… Read more …

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Greg Johnson

I'm the owner of Greenfield Flower Shop in Milwaukee, with more than 40 years of experience in the floral, wedding, and event business.


Temperature and Climate

Primroses do best in low temperatures and naturally bloom in spring in their native Europe. Primroses tolerate snow and cold much better than hot, dry conditions. Sometimes sold as Valentine's Day gifts, they are perennials in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 7 through 9. Primroses are frequently treated as annuals or grown as houseplants due to their short blooming period and because they do not tolerate heat well. To prolong blooming, keep indoor primroses in a cool part of your house. In general, primroses grow best if the temperatures are between 50 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit at night, with daytime temperatures below 80 F.


Tips on how to grow Primrose flowers

Primrose flowers also known as Primula polyantha normally bloom in early spring, and they offer a variety of form, size, and color. Primrose flowers are suitable for use in garden beds and borders and also in containers. If the plants are given the proper growing conditions, the plants will multiply every year adding stunning colors to the landscape. The plant bloom throughout summer and even in some areas the plant will continue to delight the fall season with their outstanding colors. Some of the primrose flowers seen in gardens are Polyanthus hybrids, which vary in color from white, cream and yellow to red, orange and pink. Also there are blue and purple primrose flowers. Primrose flowers prefer damp, woodland-like conditions.

How to grow Primrose Plants

Actually growing this plant is easy, they are quite hardy and adaptable. The primrose plant can be found in most garden centers and nurseries. Make sure you look for the primroses that are healthy in appearance, if possible the one with unopened buds. Also this plant can be grown from seeds with an equal mixture of soil, sand and peat moss. You can plant them indoors or outdoors depending on the time of year and the climate in your area. Usually the primrose seeds are sown indoors (also outdoors in cold frame) during winter. Once the seedlings have obtained their 2 nd or 3 rd leaves you can easily transplant them into the garden. The cuttings can also be taken from some of the varieties during summer.

How to care for Primrose plants

The plant needs to be planted in lightly shaded areas with a well-drained soil, if possible the soil should be amended with organic matter. You can set the primrose plants about six to twelve inches apart and four to six inches deep. Make sure you water them thoroughly after planting. You can add a layer of mulch around the primrose plants to help retain moisture. Make sure you continue to give the primrose plants thorough watering throughout the summer months, and also about once a week or more during periods of drought. The plants also need a light application of organic fertilizer throughout the growing season. You can keep the primrose plants to continue looking their best by regular pruning of dead leaves and spent blooms. If you actually want to collect the seeds of your primroses make sure you wait until late summer or early fall before taking the seeds. Make sure you store the seeds in a cool, dry place until the following planting season or sow the seeds in a cold frame.

Some of the problems with Primrose plants

One of the common pests affecting primrose plants are slugs and snails. The slugs and snails can be controlled with non-toxic slug bait placed around the garden. The primrose plants can also be attacked by spider mites and aphids but can be sprayed with soapy water. The plant can also be prone to crown rot and root rot if the plants are not getting enough drainage. You can easily fixed this by amending the soil with compost or relocating the primrose plants to a well-drained place. Also too much moisture can make the plant susceptible to fungal infections. You can easily prevent this by using good watering habits and also an adequate spacing between plants.


Growing Primroses Indoors: Tips For Primrose Indoor Care

The primrose houseplant (Primula) is often found for sale in the late winter or early spring. The cheery flowers on primroses can do quite a bit to chase away winter’s dreariness, but they also leave many owners asking how to grow primrose indoors. Primrose indoor care is important if you would like these lovely plant to survive. How to Grow Primrose Indoors The first thing to remember about your primrose houseplant is that the people who sold it to you did not expect you to keep it as a houseplant. Primroses indoors are typically thought of by the houseplant industry as a short term houseplant (much like orchids and poinsettias). They are sold with the intention of providing a few weeks of bright flowers and then discarded after the blooms have faded. While growing primroses indoors beyond their bloom span is possible, it is not always easy. Because of this, many people choose to simply plant their primrose houseplant out into the garden after the flowers are gone. If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light. Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in

Primroses indoors are typically thought of by the houseplant industry as a short term houseplant (much like orchids and poinsettias). They are sold with the intention of providing a few weeks of bright flowers and then discarded after the blooms have faded. While growing primroses indoors beyond their bloom span is possible, it is not always easy. Because of this, many people choose to simply plant their primrose houseplant out into the garden after the flowers are gone. If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light. Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in

If you decide that you want to keep your primroses indoors, they will need bright direct or indirect light. Primroses indoors are very susceptible to root rot, so it is important to keep them moist but not too moist. For proper primrose indoor care, water as soon as the top of the soil feels dry, but do not allow the soil to dry out as they will wilt and die quickly in the dry soil. Primroses indoors also need high humidity. You can raise the humidity around the primrose plant by placing it on a pebble tray. It is important to your success of growing primroses indoors that these plants be kept in temperatures below 80 F. They grow best in temperatures between 50 and 65 F.(10-18 C.).

Primrose houseplants should be fertilized about once a month except for when they are in bloom. They should not be fertilized at all when in bloom. Getting a primrose growing indoors to bloom again is difficult. Most people have success if they move their primrose outdoors during the summer months and bring it back inside for the winter where the plant should be allowed to go dormant for one to two months. Even with all this, there are only even odds that your primrose houseplant will bloom again.

Regardless of whether you decide to keep your primrose after it blooms or not, proper primrose indoor care will ensure that its bright, winter chasing blooms last as long as possible.


How to Care for the Primrose Flower

Consider the bright and flashy primrose flower if you have a sunny garden patch in need of vibrant color. Primrose plants are available in a wide variety of colors and the flowers give off a delightful scent as the primrose blossoms throughout the entire growing season. With minimal care, your primrose plants will thrive from year to year to bring lasting beauty to your sunny flower beds.

Prepare the sunny planting area in the spring when the growing season begins. Cultivate the soil with the garden spade down to a depth of approximately 4 inches. Add 2 inches of compost to the top of the soil and work this in well with the garden spade to incorporate the compost with the soil fully. Rake the soil smooth and level with the rake.

  • Consider the bright and flashy primrose flower if you have a sunny garden patch in need of vibrant color.
  • Cultivate the soil with the garden spade down to a depth of approximately 4 inches.

Sprinkle primrose seeds lightly over the soil. Check specific planting instructions on the seed packet for seed spacing, if possible. Lacking this information, plant the seeds 1 foot apart in the planting area. Cover each seed with approximately ¼ inch of fine soil.

Water the newly planted primrose seeds lightly immediately after you plant them to moisten the soil. Keep the soil evenly moist while the seeds germinate. Water the primrose throughout the season during drought conditions otherwise, primrose plants need little water.

  • Sprinkle primrose seeds lightly over the soil.
  • Water the newly planted primrose seeds lightly immediately after you plant them to moisten the soil.

Pinch off the spent blossoms when they fade on the stems. By deadheading the primrose plants, you encourage continued blossoming throughout the entire growing season.

Divide primrose plants in the autumn after the blossoming for the growing season ends. Dig up the primrose plants and separate the clumps into pieces 3 to 4 inches across. Replant some of the primrose plants in the same growing location and relocate other plants in other sunny growing areas. Keep the newly divided primrose plants evenly watered for two to three weeks after dividing them to minimize shock and help the plants acclimate to the change.

Primroses need little winter care. Mulch and pruning are not necessary to ensure their safety throughout the winter.


Watch the video: William Primrose plays Schubert Ave Maria