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Spinach Anthracnose Treatment – How To Manage Spinach Anthracnose

Spinach Anthracnose Treatment – How To Manage Spinach Anthracnose


By: Liz Baessler

Anthracnose of spinach is a disease that’s brought about by a fungal infection. It can cause severe damage to spinach leaves and will overwinter in the garden indefinitely if it’s not taken care of. Keep reading to learn more about symptoms of anthracnose on spinach plants and how to manage spinach anthracnose.

Spinach Anthracnose Info

Anthracnose is a disease that affects a wide range of vegetable crops and is the result of the presence of a number of fungi in the genus Colletotrichum. Anthracnose of spinach plants is mostly caused by the fungus Colletotrichum spinaciae, although it has also been traced to Colletotrichum dematium.

Symptoms of anthracnose on spinach plants start as small, watery, dark green to black spots on the leaves. These spots grow in size and turn light brown and papery. Several spots may coalesce into one, killing the leaf. Small darkly colored spores appear in the middle of the spots, marking the disease as unmistakable for anthracnose.

How to Manage Spinach Anthracnose

Anthracnose of spinach spreads through spores with can be harbored in seeds and old plant material. The best way to avoid the spread of these spores is to plant certified disease free seed and to eliminate old plant tissue at the end of the season, either by removing and destroying it or tilling it deep underground.

The spores spread best in warm, moist conditions, and the disease is most common in climates that receive frequent spring rains. It can often be controlled by providing good air circulation and watering only at the base of the plants.

Fungicides can usually provide control, especially those containing copper. The best spinach anthracnose treatment is dry weather, which will often cause the infected foliage to drop and be replaced by healthy leaves. If an outbreak of anthracnose occurs during a damp spring, it is not uncommon for it to go away on its own with the drier summer weather.

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Spinach Anthracnose Info: Managing Symptoms Of Anthracnose On Spinach Plants - garden

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Common pests and diseases: Spinach

When growing vegetables, it is always exciting to care for the plant throughout its growing phase and then harvest it for delicious recipes later on, but one thing to watch out for is pests and diseases. Different plants are susceptible to different types of pests and diseases, and it is important to make yourself aware so you can keep a watchful eye and also take any preventative methods to keep your plants safe throughout their lifespan.

Spinach can fall victim to several different pests and diseases.

Pests:

The most common pests affecting all different types of greens, spinach included, is the aphid or the leafhopper. Aphids and leafhoppers both can easily spread diseases amongst plants.

Aphids are small, soft-bodied insects and they come in colors green, yellow or purple. Leafhoppers will be green-yellow and small. If you notice either of these pests on your greens, spray them with an insecticidal soap every 10 days to discourage them. To help prevent an infestation, continuously weed your greens because unwelcome weeds may serve as the home to leafhoppers.

Another common insect problem comes from leaf miners. These insects feed mostly on spinach, but also on chard, beet and turnip greens. The larvae tunnel between the leaves’ tissue, and it causes tan-colored splotches on the leaves’ surfaces. Cover your crops with screens to control this pest.

Diseases:

Some of the most common diseases affecting spinach plants include anthracnose, damping off, downy mildew and fusarium wilt.

Anthracnose will cause small, water-soaked spots on leaves which can become enlarged. If the infection is severe, it may cause severe blighting. To prevent this problem, only plant disease-free seed and avoid overhead watering.

Damping off will cause poor germination rate, new seedlings can die, plants can become yellow and appear stunted and older plants may wilt and collapse. This is often spread by overwatering plants. To manage this disease, plant spinach in well-draining soils and avoid overwatering.

Downy mildew will cause yellow spots that become larger over time and also become tan. A purple fungal growth will be present on the undersides of the leaves. Leaves can become curled or distorted. To manage this disease, plant varieties that are resistant and be sure to apply the appropriate fungicides upon planting to protect your spinach.

Fusarium wilt will cause older leaves to become yellow, plants may reach maturity too early or die early, and there may be a reduced seed production. For seedlings, the symptoms may appear similar to damping off. To manage this, don’t plant spinach in the soil that is infested with fusarium, and be sure to practice crop rotation. Plant early and avoid overwatering during flowering stages.


Watch the video: Spinach diseases and pests